Lisa Montgomery, the only woman on death row, was found guilty of an ‘especially heinous’ crime – but those who have looked deeply into her agonized life see it differently Lisa Montgomery’s first experiences of sexual abuse occurred indirectly when she was three years old. She would lie in bed at night beside her beloved half-sister Diane, close enough to touch, while Diane, then eight, was being raped by their male babysitter.At the age of 11, Montgomery learnt what it was like to be attacked herself. Her stepfather Jack, a “mean drunk” who regularly beat her and her mother, began raping her once or twice a week.The assaults became such an important part of Jack’s life over the next four years that he built a room for the girl on the side of their trailer, deep in the Oklahoma woods. It had its own entrance, so that he could come and go as he desired and nobody would know or hear her screams.He would rape and sodomise her, often with a pillow smothering her face. When she resisted, he slammed her head so hard against the concrete floor that she suffered traumatic brain injury, MRI brain scans would later show.One day, her mother Judy happened to enter the room while the child was being assaulted by her husband. Judy was so incensed she fetched a gun and held it to her daughter’s head, screaming: “How could you do this to me?”Over time, the abuse expanded. Montgomery’s stepfather invited friends round to gang rape her in the room – ordeals that would last for hours and end with the men urinating on her like she was trash. Her mother got in on the act too, selling Montgomery’s body to the plumber and the electrician whenever she needed odd jobs doing.This is Lisa Montgomery’s story.These were her formative experiences which doctors, psychologists and social workers have all concluded amounted to torture endured across years. This is the woman, now aged 52, whom the Trump administration intends to put to death in seven days’ time on grounds that she is such a cold-hearted murderer that even being locked up for the rest of her natural life would be insufficient punishment.On Friday, a US appeals court cleared the way for the execution to proceed. The move was enthusiastically endorsed by the US justice department which has argued under Trump that Montgomery is guilty of an “especially heinous” crime. But those who have looked deeply into the agonized life that lay behind her criminal act see it differently.“This is a story about a woman who is profoundly mentally ill as a result of a lifetime of torture and sexual violence,” said Sandra Babcock, faculty director of the Cornell Center on the Death Penalty Worldwide and a consultant to Montgomery’s legal team. “Lisa is not the worst of the worst – she is the most broken of the broken.”> Lisa is not the worst of the worst – she is the most broken of the broken> > Sandra BabcockShould Montgomery’s execution go ahead by lethal injection at the federal death chamber in Terre Haute, Indiana, on 12 January it would be the first execution of a woman by the US government in almost 70 years. She would also be among the first prisoners to be executed by a lame-duck president in more than a century, as Donald Trump rushes to kill three prisoners over four days as a macabre climax of his time in the White House.Nobody would disagree that the crime for which Montgomery was convicted was anything but horrifying. Its details are hard to contemplate.On 16 December 2004, at the age of 36, she traveled from her home in Kansas to the tiny town of Skidmore in Missouri to meet Bobbie Jo Stinnett, a woman she had got to know online through their shared love of dogs.Stinnett, a dog breeder, was eight months pregnant with her first child. Montgomery went to see her ostensibly to buy a puppy, but once inside the house she attacked Stinnett and strangled her to death with a rope.She then cut out the fetus using a kitchen knife, and over the next several hours attempted to pass off the newborn baby as her own. She was arrested the following day after the discovery of Stinnett’s body; the baby was returned to her family, and went on to be raised by her father.For some Americans, including it seems Trump who has resumed federal executions after a hiatus of 17 years, the Lisa Montgomery case stops there. She committed a horrendous murder, and now it is time for her to face the ultimate punishment that she deserves.But to the lawyers and professional experts who have spent years investigating Montgomery’s crime, personality and formative experiences, the chilling headlines about her gruesome act are just the beginning of a journey – not towards condoning or excusing, but towards understanding.“We need to understand what could lead to someone being so profoundly disconnected from their actions that they would be capable of doing something that a normal healthy person would find unimaginable,” said Katherine Porterfield, a child psychologist specialising in treating survivors of torture. Porterfield spent many hours with Montgomery over 18 days as part of an appeals process in 2016.“Things that are almost impossible to comprehend are comprehensible when you take into account mental illness, massive childhood trauma and what that does to kids,” she said.Part of the journey towards understanding has involved taking on board the inadequate legal defense Montgomery received at the sentencing phase of her trial. It was in 2007, and the jury, which had already convicted her of murder and kidnapping, was being asked to decide whether or not to put her on death row.At her 2007 trial, Montgomery was represented by a public defense lawyer who had never tried a capital case and by Fred Duchardt, a Kansas City attorney with a particular claim to fame. In 2016, the Guardian revealed that Duchardt had the distinction of having more of his clients sentenced to death in federal court than any other defence lawyer in America – four out of seven federal death row inmates from Missouri had had the fortune, or misfortune, to have him as their attorney.Montgomery’s lawyers gave her the narrowest of defenses at trial. Duchardt came up with a peculiar legal argument – that she suffered from a rare mental illness called pseudocyesis which induced the delusion in her that Stinnett’s baby was her own.The theory didn’t fit the facts, and the jury didn’t buy it. Having found Montgomery guilty, they were also unimpressed by the limited mitigating evidence that was presented to them during the sentencing phase of the trial. The defense lawyers cited some evidence of physical abuse, called a few woefully prepared witnesses, and that was about it. The prosecutors lampooned the thinly argued plea to spare her execution the “abuse excuse”.And so Montgomery duly came to condemned to death on 26 October 2007.It was only years later, when a fresh team of defense lawyers began to represent Montgomery at appeal, that the vast extent of the sexual violence and torture that she had absorbed as a child began to emerge. As part of their investigations, the legal team employed several expert witnesses to examine the prisoner and piece together her story.Janet Vogelsang, a clinical social worker, spent several long days talking to Montgomery in 2016. After many hours slowly gaining the prisoner’s trust, and learning about her childhood trauma, Vogelsang began to have a sense of deja vu with similar sessions she had had with military veterans traumatized by war.“Talking to Lisa was like talking to Vietnam and Korean war veterans who had been held in holes and bamboo cages under the most horrible conditions,” Vogelsang told the Guardian.At the end of her researches, Vogelsang produced a mammoth 184-page social history of Montgomery’s life. Most of the material she chronicled had never been presented to the jury.It included the sexual assaults and the gang rapes, the sexual trafficking and the violence. But that was just the start of it. There was also the constant demeaning and humiliation.From a young age, Montgomery’s mother would duct tape her mouth to prevent her talking. The girl was stripped naked and made to stand on the porch in front of drunken visitors, then told she would be sent away to a home if she made the slightest noise.Her parents made her beat her younger sister with a board until the child bled. Then there was that room on the side of the trailer where her stepfather abused her, not just sexually but in the depths of her psyche.“He cut a hole in the closet where he could go and watch her in the room when she was back from school,” Vogelsang recalled. “The stepfather would sit in the closet to surveil her. So she found the one tiny part of the room where she could stand where he could not see her – she would literally curl up in that corner for hours just to stay out of his field of vision.”Vogelsang’s report concludes that what Montgomery experienced in the room was tantamount to the torture more commonly experienced by child soldiers and prisoners of war. “She was isolated, brainwashed, humiliated and degraded, not allowed to speak, and beaten at will.”Porterfield told the Guardian that in her one-to-one sessions with the prisoner, she quickly came to recognize symptoms of trauma and mental illness. “When I met with her she would become spacey,” she said.“She would not be able to keep her train of thought, and describe strange ways of thinking to describe her reality. She lives in a state of disassociation, going in and out all the time. When I asked about her childhood, she would display an inability to connect to her emotions – with a blank facial expression, blank voice, talking about herself in the third person.”Porterfield and Vogelsang are united in their diagnosis of Montgomery. “There is no question,” Porterfield said. “Mrs Montgomery is profoundly mentally ill. She has multiple impairments, no question at all about that.”Since Montgomery has received intensive psychiatric care and analysis in the prison system she has been variously diagnosed with bipolar disorder, PTSD, anxiety and depression, psychosis, mood swings, disassociation and memory loss. Exhaustive studies of her childhood and early adulthood suggest that she was grappling with many of these conditions before, and leading immediately up to, the committing of her crime.In the months leading up to the murder, she had several episodes in which she told those around her that she was pregnant – a claim that was palpably false as she was involuntarily sterilized after the birth of her fourth child. She also displayed all the symptoms of her mental illness, including disassociation, memory loss and profound depression.> I have never seen a case like this> > Sandra BabcockAnd yet nobody ever came to her assistance or offered her any protection or help. It is the one booming theme of the Lisa Montgomery story that leaps out of the court documents, every bit as strongly as the horrifying crime that she went on to commit: society failed her.Only once throughout her entire rotten childhood did social workers pay the family a visit, and even then they helpfully called Montgomery’s parents ahead of time so that they were able to enforce silence upon her on pain of death.Then there was the doctor in Oklahoma who examined her as a child, learnt about the regular rapes – but did nothing about it. The child welfare office whom Montgomery’s mother, Judy, informed about the sexual abuse – but did nothing about it. And the family court judge who presided at the parents’ divorce who actually scolded Judy for failing to report the rape of her daughter to police – but then himself did absolutely nothing about it.Society failed Lisa Montgomery, not once, not twice, but repeatedly. Now society, in the form of the Trump administration, is preparing to kill her as punishment for the outcome.Sandra Babcock told the Guardian that over the past 30 years she has defended hundreds of prisoners facing execution in countries around the world, “and I have never seen a case like this. I don’t know of any execution in the US or elsewhere that has been carried out on someone who has been subjected to such unrelenting sexual torture and violence.”Babcock said that she is convinced most Americans would want to halt the execution were they to know all the facts about what Lisa Montgomery did and what came before that. Most Americans do not know all the facts.The clock is ticking. “If the execution goes ahead we should all feel a deep sense of shame,” she said.

Nuke her.

She made her choices, and actions have consequences.

loading...

Enrique Tarrio was arrested as the group was sued in the destruction of a Black Lives Matter sign at another D.C. church during pro-Trump protests.

Fuck DC and blm

I haven't seen any of the antifa or blm terrorists arrested for burning cities, cars, and the American flag.

loading...

The hosts of Fox News’ “Fox & Friends” said Monday that outgoing president Donald Trump is courting “anarchy” with his call for post-election protests.Ainsley Earhardt outlined the concerns Republicans — particularly the strongest of Trump’s base — are highlighting as they back Trump’s baseless assertion that widespread fraud led to the election of President-elect Joe Biden. Trump’s supporters and allies, as Earhardt noted, have pointed to worries over the possibility of phony votes being attributed to dead people or mail-in ballot fraud.“That’s the case that Donald Trump and his lawyers have put out. They said there’s all this evidence but they haven’t really produced the evidence,” countered Steve Doocy.Also Read: Georgia Secretary of State Says Trump 'Pushed' Him Into 'Not Appropriate' Call About Vote Counts (Video)He noted that in the audio of a call between Trump and the Georgia secretary of state published over the weekend, Trump raised the possibility of “thousands of dead people” voting. Secretary Brad Raffensperger pointed out that the president had incorrect data and the state had already looked into those claims and found nothing to back them up.Co-host Brian Kilmeade said that what he’s most worried about is “the protest the president is calling for on Tuesday and Wednesday.”He explained, “I mean, this is the type of anarchy that doesn’t work for anybody — Republicans or Democrats — in the big picture and I just think it’s up to the president’s legal team to produce what they are telling them they have. For example, if they have thousands — if they have 200 dead people voting in Nevada, can I see the names?”Watch below.Brian Kilmeade says Ted Cruz's election audit & Trump's call for protests are "the type of anarchy that doesn't work for anybody" and calls yet again for Trump's lawyers to produce evidence of their many lies. Steve Doocy tells viewers that online rumors are inadmissible in court pic.twitter.com/9yqpcq3HsL— Bobby Lewis (@revrrlewis) January 4, 2021Read original story ‘Fox and Friends’ Says Trump Courts ‘Anarchy’ With Call for Election Protests: ‘There Is No Proof’ of Fraud At TheWrap

Literally mountains of proof you commie fuckwad

loading...

KENOSHA, Wis. (Reuters) -Wisconsin prosecutors on Tuesday cleared a white police officer of criminal charges in the shooting a Black man from behind in the presence of his young children, leaving him paralyzed and triggering deadly protests that inflamed U.S. racial tensions. Kenosha County District Attorney Michael Graveley found officer Rusten Sheskey acted in self-defense while responding to a domestic dispute last Aug. 23 and shooting Jacob Blake seven times at close range, saying Blake was armed with a knife and had resisted arrest, withstanding multiple Taser shots.

unlawfully charged for defending his life

not one word about the convicted felon carrying a gun

loading...

Georgia election official Gabriel Sterling condemned President Trump’s call with Georgia’s secretary of state, saying, “I personally found it to be something that was not normal, out of place and nobody I know who would be president would do something like that to a secretary of state."

If you listen to the call in it's entirety you'll see what a piece of shit the lying media and gabriel sterling truly are.

loading...

On Sunday, Colorado Rep. Lauren Boebert began her first term as a newly elected Congresswoman by loudly and proudly sharing her love of guns and the Second Amendment in a now-viral ad on Twitter. In the ad, the Republican politician is seen loading a Glock and securing it in a gun holster around her waist before hitting the streets of Washington, D.C. to tell viewers why she’s in favor of carrying the weapon with her at all times. “Even though I now work in one of the most liberal cities in America, I refuse to give up my rights, especially my Second Amendment rights,” Boebert says to the camera as she walks toward the U.S. Capitol. She goes on to declare: “I will carry my firearm in D.C. and in Congress. This caused outrage from Democrats and the media. Why? It’s our job in Congress to defend your rights, including your Second Amendment, and that’s exactly what I’m here to do.” Boebert is then seen walking through more residential and back streets as she gives the “real reasons why [she] defends [her]self in the nation’s capital.” According to her, its thanks to the state’s crime and homicide rates, both listed without statistics in the ad, and the fact that she is “a 5-foot tall, 100-pound woman [who] chooses to protect myself legally.” Boebert also goes on to claim that people who live in D.C. “don’t understand how we live in real America.” She ends the ad by recalling the 2019 presidential rally of former Rep. Beto O’Rourke, where she told him “hell no” to his proposed buyback program for AR-15s and AK-47s, and doubles down on her right to carry in D.C. Let me tell you why I WILL carry my Glock to Congress. Government does NOT get to tell me or my constituents how we are allowed to keep our families safe.I promise to always stand strong for our 2nd Amendment rights.https://t.co/E75tYpdN4B pic.twitter.com/qg7QGenrNo— Lauren Boebert (@laurenboebert) January 4, 2021 So, where exactly did this congressperson come from? Boebert’s entry into Congress comes after a busy 2020 securing her place in politics. Prior to her appearance at O’Rourke’s rally, she was solely known as the owner of Shooters Grill in Rifle, Colo., where the staff is armed at all times. Following her “hell no” statement, Boebert next made headlines in June 2020 when she defeated former Rep. Scott Tipton in the Republican primary for Colorado’s 3rd district; her win was described as an upset due to Tipton’s five previous terms in office and she received the congratulatory praise of President Donald Trump. On the campaign trail, Boebert was vocal about her support for Trump and for open-carry laws. But then she was elected, giving her free rein to spew her second amendment ideas all over Twitter. In November, Boebert defeated former Rep. Diane Mitsch Bush for a seat in the House, taking 51.4% of the votes while Mitsch Bush got 45.2%. Her win made her the first woman to represent Colorado’s 3rd Congressional District. And in spite of the swift backlash to her ad, Boebert has stood by it, tweeting on Sunday, “Let me tell you why I WILL carry my Glock to Congress. Government does NOT get to tell me or my constituents how we are allowed to keep our families safe. I promise to always stand strong for our 2nd Amendment rights.” She even announced, as a follow-up, the launch of the Second Amendment Caucus with Rep. Thomas Massie, which she says they “will be Co-Chairing, to fight for your Constitutional rights. #2A.” As eager as Boebert is to carry her weapon throughout D.C., which would be legal thanks to a 1967 regulation allowing members of Congress to be in possession of a firearm at the U.S. Capitol, she needs to first be registered in D.C. — and just not her native Colorado — to avoid being charged, according to The Washington Post. “There are no exceptions in the District of Columbia,” D.C. police chief Robert J. Contee III said Monday. “We plan to reach out to the congresswoman’s office to make sure that she is aware of what the laws of the District of Columbia are, what the restrictions are.”   Like what you see? How about some more R29 goodness, right here?Is This The Thing That Will Land Trump In Jail?Trump Has Some A Conspiracy Theory About GeorgiaDoes Trump Think He Won A Nobel Peace Prize?

What part of "Shall NOT be infringed" do you dimwits not understand?

loading...

The 62-year-old pastor reportedly confronted Mytrez Deunte Woolen with a gun, but he was overpowered. A pastor was killed and two parishioners were injured in a church shooting in East Texas on Sunday. Authorities had been searching for 21-year-old Mytrez Deunte Woolen on Saturday, using dogs and drones, when the pastor of Starrville Methodist Church in Winona reportedly discovered him hiding in a church bathroom Sunday.

Stop arresting these pieces of shit!

They get shot resisting arrest......

loading...

The leader of one of the nation's most prominent U.S. Attorney's offices said Tuesday he is resigning after nearly three years of prosecuting terrorists, spies and political operatives. G. Zachary Terwilliger, U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Virginia, is joining the private sector with a post at the Vinson and Elkins law firm. Terwilliger, 39, is the youngest U.S. Attorney in the country and has led the office since 2018, but his connections to the office go back to 1999, when he worked there as an intern.

Still think nothing is happening?

loading...

A new strain of the coronavirus, first identified in the U.K., has now been reported in Connecticut, Pennsylvania and Texas. Here's what to know.

This is total bullshit! Reputable scientists, using scanning electron microscopes, haven't been able to find a shred of evidence that chinky pox exists at all.

loading...

It took a global pandemic and stay-at-home orders for 1.5 billion people worldwide, but something is finally occurring to us: The future we thought we expected may not be the one we get. To envision a future altered by coronavirus, Quartz asked dozens of experts for their best predictions on how the world will be different in five years. Below is an answer from Bill Nye, a science communicator, star of such shows as Bill Nye Saves the World, and author of the New York Times bestseller Everything All at Once.

bill nye, the phony scientist guy says stupid shit again

loading...
Dissenter
connecting...