...The director thinks that Dune is a critique of capitalism. The book about neo-medieval aristocrats fighting for resources and power is supposed to be saying capitalism bad. Whatever Denis Villeneuve read is not the same Dune that I've read.

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Persona 5 was a great game with a very troubling scene of implied sexual harassment, if not sexual assault. The latest version of the game has an edited version of that moment, but it doesn’t do much to fix what made the original so troubling.

Keep in mind this is the same moron who thought the songs in Persona 5 said "retarded." I love how they don't even acknowledge that the scenes are obviously meant to be played for laughs. It's like they've never learned how writing fiction works.

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As a nerd who played the first Persona 5 release, the gay characters hitting on Ryuji are a minor joke with no relevance to any story or gameplay. At the same time, they're obviously meant to be comic relief that plays on stereotypes, so these censors need to calm the hell down. Unless, of course, they mean to say that any jokes based on stereotypes are bad. Though, considering how these types tend to label anyone they disagree with as racist, and considering how they demonize muh straight white male, I doubt they'd have the ability to avoid such moral and logical inconsistencies.

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History doesn't repeat, but it does rhyme. The 2000s and 2010s strongly echo the Gilded Age and late 1800s.

  1. Corruption seemingly everywhere.
  2. Large-scale changes in labor- specifically new technologies and poor conditions for the working class laborer. 1890s- further adaption to industrialization, development of new business strategies, labor unions gain momentum but at great cost. 2000s- further adaption to digitization, development of new business strategies, wage stagnation.
  3. Popular, but not ubiquitous, moral outrage/conflict blaming something specific as the cause of all moral ills. For the 1890s it was immigration, alcohol, and "obscenity." Since the 2000s it's been racism/sexism and immigration, violence in art, and "obscenity."
  4. Distant memory of a major military conflict. 1890s- American Civil War. 2000s- Vietnam War.
  5. Presence of moderate military conflict with potentially suspicious origins and major economic motivations. 1890s- Spanish-American War, Boxer Rebellion, etc. 2000s- War on Terror.
  6. Politics as a spectator sport before mass disillusionment. 1890s- grand political parades, massive conventions, record voter turnouts. 2000s- social media, massive conventions.
  7. Economic crisis. 1890s- Panic of 1893. 2000s- Great Recession of 2008.
  8. Transition from morality-focused politics to economy-focused politics. 1890s- Post-Civil-War reconstruction and race issues lose popularity. Tariffs/taxes, business reform, and gold standard vs. silver standard become prominent policy issues. 2000s- race and gender issues lose popularity. Tariffs/taxes/welfare, business reform, healthcare reform, and student loan forgiveness becomes prominent policy issues.

As such, we can expect to see major destabilization of American institutions within the next decade or two. This could take the form of anything from a large-scale war, a painful economic depression, or even a strongly-felt climate crisis. However, assuming we survive the crisis, millennials and zoomers will reconstruct cultural institutions; the survivors get to fight each other and hopefully make things better.

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Looks like 18 is old enough to die on the frontlines in a foreign country, but still not old enough to smoke a cigarette. This is the kind of shit the Republicans need to stop trying to pull if they want to retain the moderates. Furthermore, it won't make much a difference as far as actual use of tobacco products goes. If anything, the increased sense of taboo danger will encourage edgy teens to pick up smoking.

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I remember hearing that BPA had negative health impacts years ago. Funny how we've still done next to nothing to regulate them federally.

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That RPS author, Cox, realizes that street gangs and other criminal organizations are almost always based on ethnic lines right? That's not a stereotype: it's observable reality.

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Any story will reflect the writer's views. It may not be written with the intent of clubbing everyone with muh social message, but observers will be able to see into the writer's mind.

The thing that these people don't understand, is that shoehorning in their political messages without telling a good story is just bad writing. If Person X is gay, that's fine. Either make it an otherwise mostly irrelevant detail like their clothing, or make it a point for character development. If you make a big deal about it but don't actually develop that part of the character, then you're just a bad writer trying to put a political message where it doesn't belong.

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I don’t watch Game of Thrones – which makes me a lot more interesting than you | Game of Thrones | The Guardian

...Is this supposed to be satire? Other than incompetence on the part of the author and editor, I can't think of any other reason why this would be published.

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Oooooh!~

A new trespass for the wheel of being offended! Cleft lip!~

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